Archive for the ‘The Generals’ Category

The Generals – Zhukov

Tuesday, December 7th, 2010

Mitchievilles’ Minister of War, Reg, was doing a series on great Generals. It was a great series, and Reg speaks from the heart.

“In 1939 he commanded the Red Banner army in Outer Mongolia, where the Russians were engaged in a frontier struggle with the Japanese. Zhukov applied classic cavalry tactics to armored warfare: he massed his tanks, smashed a hole through the center of the Japanese Sixth Army, and bloodily crushed its flanks between his fanning-out Panzers and advancing infantry. This little-known action helped deter the Japanese from attacking the Soviet rear in 1941, leaving Stalin free to bring his Siberian troops westward to the defense of Moscow’.

Zhukov was the man in charge of Moscow’s defense. He administered the first major defeat the Wehrmacht suffered. Assigned to Stalingrad, he transformed a threatened Russian disaster into a German catastrophe. Then it was Leningrad’s turn, and again Zhukov—ruthless and imperturbable, yet strangely capable of inspiring his peasant soldiers—broke a German siege. From defense he turned to offense, flaming westward across the Ukraine in 1943, into Poland in 1944.” – Time Magazine – Feb. 21, 1955

When Should I Use I.E.?

Saturday, September 4th, 2010

I’m really sorry for posting this, initially, I thought it said “When Should I Collect UI?”

The Mayor knows he’s not the person who should be lecturing people on grammar, sentence structure, spelling, proper punctuation, or short-forms like i.e. But when it comes to UI (unemployment insurance in the land of the green eyed monsters), ya, I could learn ya a thing or two.

Punctuation and short-form though, that’s another matter entirely. When it comes to short-form The Mayor is about as helpful as a comb to the audience at a Rogaine seminar, i.e., three bushels of wheat.

Told you.

General Pershing Wishes You A Merry Christmas

Thursday, December 24th, 2009

general-pershing

The Kammhuber line

Tuesday, December 22nd, 2009

Across my life is the shadow of World War Two. Growing up, the adults around me were veterans of combat, of factories, or of the merchant marine. That great and terrible war killed my uncles, put scars on my father, and took the lives of the sweethearts of my aunts. And behind the large mountain that was The War, were the details, events, battles, and campaigns. I discovered this man, a general, whose influence stands astride this great war, and reaches into my life, distant in time and across the surface of the earth. That man is Luftwaffe General of Nightfighers Josef Kammhuber * .

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The Generals – Lavr Kornilov

Sunday, November 22nd, 2009

I truly enjoyed the series The Generals that Mitchieville’s Minister of War (at the time) Reg was putting up. Here is another one, one you probably only heard bad things about in Marxist Theory as taught you in your Ontario Math class:

General Kornilov now has fans, too, as the youtube selection shows. You can read about the storied history of this general on the wikipedia * . Anyone who can get an intro set to the Farewell of Slavianka has got to be an interesting fellow. And, politically correct, too. The good general is neither a Catholic (haters of a womans right to choose between work and more work) nor a Mormon (haters of the poly-gendereds’ rights to be joined in blasphemous ceremonies on church grounds that they neither support nor maintain). He married out of his ‘race’ (being a Cossack who married an Uzbek), and certainly did his bit in fighting Global Warming by embracing the use of calvary in the armed forces. What a great guy. We need more like him. Maybe he could solve the Caledonia crisis, using his special diplomatic touch.

I think an Ontario high school should be named after him.

There’s A Cause I’ll Donate To

Friday, October 2nd, 2009

wwf

I’ll give that panda $40 (Canadian, not that useless American currency) if after he belts the other one over the skull with the chair, he gives him a suplex, followed by a piledriver, and then uses the Boston crab as his finishing move.

Or, I’ll give them both $10 each and some fruit berries and small roots if they just sit there and look adorable.

Either way, we ALL win.

The Generals

Sunday, July 19th, 2009

Here is an interesting one …

Odet of Foix * .

Claim to fame: His sister was mistress to the Queen of France. Back then, whitey looked out for his own family members, to the exclusion of persons of ability. Thank Set, the Snake God that we are reintroducing nepotism and simony, and other once-dead third world practices to Canada.

Getting Things Done The Slim Way

Saturday, December 15th, 2007

“His encounter with the Japanese in Burma, recounted in Defeat into Victory, was no such lark. Fought with little air support in jungles with few roads, it remains one of the brightest Allied chapters in World War II history. In 1942, after service in the Middle East, Slim was ordered to the command of the First Burma Corps in Prome. Neither he nor his army stayed there long.

Armed with World War I weapons and saddled with trench-war concepts of strategy, the corps proved no match for the Japanese, who steadily and easily pushed the British back to the Indian border. By the spring of 1942, Slim admits, “we, the Allies, had been outmanoeuvred, outfought, and outgeneralled.” Slim, as commander of the XV Corps and then of the Fourteenth Army, planned carefully for revenge.

He gradually built up the shattered confidence of his troops—who regarded the Japanese as invincible in jungle fighting—by refusing at first to engage in battle unless he had an overwhelming superiority in numbers, and could make sure of victory. Since the Burmese theater stood low on the priority list for supplies and troop replacements, Slim turned poverty to good advantage.

His support forces learned to improvise, devising jute parachutes for supply drops when silk ones were unavailable, arming yachts and tugboats with Bren guns to replace unavailable gunboats. His armies discovered that full field equipment hindered mobility, and often went to battle as lightly armed as guerrillas.” – Time Magazine, Aug. 24, 1962

Getting Things Done The Zhukov Way

Thursday, December 13th, 2007

“In 1939 he commanded the Red Banner army in Outer Mongolia, where the Russians were engaged in a frontier struggle with the Japanese. Zhukov applied classic cavalry tactics to armored warfare: he massed his tanks, smashed a hole through the center of the Japanese Sixth Army, and bloodily crushed its flanks between his fanning-out Panzers and advancing infantry. This little-known action helped deter the Japanese from attacking the Soviet rear in 1941, leaving Stalin free to bring his Siberian troops westward to the defense of Moscow’.

Zhukov was the man in charge of Moscow’s defense. He administered the first major defeat the Wehrmacht suffered. Assigned to Stalingrad, he transformed a threatened Russian disaster into a German catastrophe. Then it was Leningrad’s turn, and again Zhukov—ruthless and imperturbable, yet strangely capable of inspiring his peasant soldiers—broke a German siege. From defense he turned to offense, flaming westward across the Ukraine in 1943, into Poland in 1944.” – Time Magazine – Feb. 21, 1955

Getting Things Done The Zhukov Way

Saturday, December 8th, 2007


“When Zhukov broke through the Bug line a month ago, the whole German line began to fall back. Zhukov knew he could not encircle a force retreating twelve to 18 miles a day, decided to outrace it.

The German units changed their route again & again, wasted men and precious time. Zhukov began to push them off the roads, compel them to accept battle in swamps. The orderly retreat had been turned into flight. Heavy equipment was left behind. Supply trains clogged up the roads. He seized its roads, rail centers, by quick penetrations, straddled the few good retreat routes across a muddy, wooded flatland.

Said Moscow: in four weeks of March, Zhukov’s army alone killed 183,000 men, captured 25,000, seized or destroyed 2,100 tanks, 4,600 guns, 54,000 trucks. Last week, at two railway junctions, Red units captured 1,600 railroad cars loaded with food, ammunition, loot, wounded Germans.” – Time Magazine, April 17, 1944

Posted by Suvorov